X

Looks like you are a new visitor to this site. Hello!

Welcome to Hope For Film! Come participate in the discussion, and I encourage you to enter your email address in the sidebar and subscribe. It's free! And easy! If you have any suggestions on how to improve this website or suggestions for topics please don't hesitate to write in to any of the blogs.

You can also follow me on Twitter or Facebook.

(If you keep getting this message, you probably have cookies turned off.)

September 30 at 2:19am

Making Net Neutrality The Key Indie Film Issue

If it wasn’t clear already, I think Net Neutrality is the key issue for all filmmakers.  

On Saturday morning I gave the Key Note talk for Film Independent’s annual Filmmaker Forum.  I posted the speech (A Thousand Phoenix Rising) on Let’s Make Better Films.  Please read it.
All this is pretty swell, but it truly illustrates the need for maintaining Net Neutrality.  The internet is the home of free speech and participation.  There is no such thing as free choice if you don’t know what the choice is.  To make decisions, we all must be able to access all info immediately and equally.  It’s not like old media would have covered something like my talk.


  • Digg
  • Google Bookmarks
  • email
  • Print
September 30 at 1:21am

Things That Could Bring Progress

BBC News has a story on the spread of Mobile Broadband via a new alliance of PC manufactures, chip makers, and phone firms.  The basic plan is to build wireless chips that will work with third and fourth gen wireless,  promote via a distinct brand, and get the laptops on the shelves in 91 countries by Christmas.

All I know is that the US has dropped from 3rd to something like 26th (I have to look it up) in the last three years, and what we call Broadband is about 40x weaker than what they have in South Korea.
I believe that when people can get stuff fast and it looks real good, they will also want everything possible.  The dream of getting it where ever you are, when ever you want it is here.  Technology is delivering.  Fulfilling the promise is now dependent on maintaing Net Neutrality.


  • Digg
  • Google Bookmarks
  • email
  • Print
September 26 at 10:08am

Obama On Net Neutrality

Only one candidate is committed to a free and open internet.


  • Digg
  • Google Bookmarks
  • email
  • Print
September 24 at 2:08pm

Even More Than Net Neutrality: Common Carriage On All Infrastructure

Last Monday I was on a panel on Net Neutrality at Independent Film Week in NYC that was moderated by David Rosen.   David knows of what he speaks.  He recently penned an article in Filmmaker Mag that is available right here.  

Rosen chronicles the Telecoms and Cable Controllers attempt, with endorsement from the MPAA mind you, to create a separate — but far from equal — internet for exclusively video content that seeks to be fully immune from the demands of common carriage.  He takes our battle a step forward:

“Net neutrality is a distraction,” argues Bruce Kushnick, of Teletruth, a broadband customer advocacy group. “As long as the telco and cable companies control the infrastructure and are allowed to vertically integrate all products (i.e., offer local and long distance, connection to the Internet, broadband and even wireless), they can control any activity or any competition over the networks, including all video. The only next step is to have common carriage returned: While the underlying infrastructure may be controlled by the incumbent, all applications and services should be allowed by all parties.”

Maintaining equal for all is the biggest battle the independent film community currently faces.  Without Net Neutrality there is no assurance that information will be “distributed on a first-come, first-served basis no matter from which applications provider they come from or to which destination they are intended” (Rosen) — you know?  Equality.  Remember that?


  • Digg
  • Google Bookmarks
  • email
  • Print

This site could not have been built without the help and insight of Michael Morgenstern. My thanks go out to him.

Help save indie film and give this guy a job in web design or film!