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April 30 at 8:31am

Facebook Further Reduces Your Control Over Personal Information

As The Electronic Frontier Foundation reported last week:

Facebook removed its users’ ability to control who can see their own interests and personal information. Certain parts of users’ profiles, “including your current city, hometown, education and work, and likes and interests” will now be transformed into “connections,” meaning that they will be shared publicly. If you don’t want these parts of your profile to be made public, your only option is to delete them.


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April 29 at 8:39am

What Film Festivals Should Do To Better Serve Their Communities

Over at The Workbook Project, Saskia Wilson-Brown continues her thoughtful consideration of the role of film festivals and how to improve it.  She provides a good bullet list precisely about what festivals can do to better serve both filmmakers and their communities.  Read it.  Absorb it.  Adopt it.  Spread it.

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April 28 at 8:05am

Broadband Is A Communication Service

Broadband is not an information service like Google or Amazon.  It is a communication service like telephony.  Thusly, we need a government agency, like the FCC, to regulate it and protect consumers and all the other diverse interests involved.  This is going to require the US Congress to get involved to fix the way it is currently misclassified.  There is a good op/ed in the New York Times about it.  But it warrants calling your representatives and telling them how you feel.

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April 26 at 8:32am

The Possible Benefits Of Film Futures Exchanges, And…

By now you’ve probably heard that the US Congress has approved two different film future exchanges, (i.e. commodity exchanges).  Variety, among others, have been covering the story in what we have to recognize as an inflammatory way (then again, why should they not be like the rest of the media).

The  press has uniformly been very biased in the way the story is told, always positioning the exchages as “a gamble” and a haven for speculation.  Sure, I suspect that these exchanges will prove to be a very disruptive influence, but that does not mean they are shouldn’t be allowed.  And yes,  I am all in favor of far greater government supervision of our financial industries, but again that does not mean new mechanisms shouldn’t be given a chance.  There is a great deal more to the story of these exchanges that needs be put on the table, as they offer us many benefits beyond what the press would have us understand is a simply another opportunity to gamble.

I am grossly disappointed in the lack of action from film industry leaders to do anything to help to establish a sustainable investor class for the entertainment industry. [...]


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April 22 at 8:26am

Are you joining me tomorrow?

I am speaking at the Tribeca Film Festival.  I promise to say some lively things, even some things controversial.  I know it should be fun and informative — there’s a lot of good people on the panel.

This is the panel description:
Is The Sky Falling? A Closer Look at the Future of Film Distribution
Depending on whom you ask, the landscape of film distribution is changing either for the better or worse. So which is it? Is the sky really falling on the film industry? Join filmmakers, sales agents, and distributors in a discussion about enabling independent film and filmmakers to reach audiences and make money in this digital landscape. Panelists include Eamonn Bowles, president of Magnolia Pictures, Ted Hope, producer/partner of This Is That Productions, Efe Cakarel, founder and CEO of The Auteurs, Arvind Ethan David, CEO of Slingshot Studios and producer of The Infidel, Paul Cohen, president of Red Hills Releasing, and Marc Simon, partner at Cowan, DeBaets, Abrahams & Sheppard LLP. Moderated by Geoff Gilmore, Chief Creative Officer of Tribeca Enterprises. Friday, April 23, 2:00 PM, SVA Theater 2

If you haven’t already: buy tickets here.

If you missed it here is Tribeca’s wrap up of it.

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April 19 at 11:11am

Talk Back To “The Take-Back”

Although there is certainly a lot of “truth in the jest”, HammerToNail’s Tully’s plea to end all the blah-blah-blah of film panels on how-to-social-media-ize-your-film-to-glory and Stop-the-sky-from-falling-by-old-white-guys (I am on one this week!) is still written as humor: no one really needs another manifesto (and I live to write a manifesto each week). Yet…

The Take-Back has gotten a good deal of Talk Back. I think many of us fall on both side of the fence: tired of the same old, same old, and desiring to figure out some way to get the conversation started. Let’s face it: we need to figure out how to get people to talk about culture in a more meaningful way. Still though, Tully’s started a lot of good dialogue on film panels and their relevance. Now Brian Geldin of The Film Panel Notetaker has chimed in. Check out his post and lend your voice to the discussion.

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April 7 at 2:18pm

PGA Approves Transmedia Producer Credit

This is PGA’s wording for providing the credit:

A transmedia narrative project or franchise must consist of three (or more) narrative storylines existing within the same fictional universe on any of the following platforms: film, television, short film, broadband, publishing, comics, animation, mobile, special venues, dvd/blu-ray/cd-rom, narrative commercial and marketing rollouts, and other technologies that may or may not currently exist. These narrative extensions are not the same as repurposing material from one platform to be cut or repurposed to different platforms.

[...]


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