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November 20 at 11:20am

Sometimes We Forget To Do The Obvious

If the best solution is the easiest solution, what takes us so long to do it?  The film industry complains about piracy.  But what do we do about it?  If you want to find a movie available illegally, all you have to do is search for it.  But what if you don’t want to have the artists or their supporters suffer? What if you want to make sure that they are compensated for the work they have created? How do you find the legal sites?

Now there is a solution.  Finally… [...]


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March 10 at 9:14am

What Does The Film Industry REALLY Think?

Stephen Follows and his team surveyed 1,235 film industry professionals, all of whom have attended at least one of the three major film markets (Cannes, Berlin or AFM) within the past five years and asked questions on a variety of hot topics including piracy, the appeal of 3D, gender, and how optimistic industry professionals are for 2014.

To receive a free 25 page PDF containing all the results,  sign up for his email mailing list at [...]


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December 16 at 8:15am

Piracy: (Some Of) The Short & The Long Of It

Thankfully, Taylor Hackford recognizes that the film industry needs to wise up and educate itself on piracy. He and I agree on that. And I think we agree on the goal of it all, but I suspect we have completely different approaches to solving the problem.  And that is where I am really concerned.  To solve it, Hackford seems willing to sacrifice greater principles in the service of business, and that is a shame.  I hope I am wrong.

Mr. Hackford, president of the DGA, was recently speaking at the Content Protection Summit and Variety reported on it. Reading the article I remain unclear as to what Hackford’s point is about piracy beyond that it is bad and we need to make it a real concern of the industry. He seems to be saying that if we want to protect our content, we have to be willing to give up on a free and open internet. He claims groups like Public Knowledge and Free Press as enemies. Shutting down a free and open internet is not the path to solving the piracy problem; it is the path to a closed society that favors a class or capital over access and opportunity — and that is the antithesis of what we need to do.

We can not create a system that favors the powerful, the connected, or the well capitalized. [...]


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